NRA Tweet When Dick’s Destroyed Assault Rifles Gave Boost to Retailer

Money Time |

The last thing that the NRA (National Rifle Association) expected when they posted a Tweet about Dick’s Sporting Goods and their destruction of assault rifles met with an unexpected result.


Clearly the NRA was hoping for condemnation but instead parise has been heaped upon the retailer who last year stopped assault rifle sales with the result that it ended up with $5million worth of arms it did not want. 

The CEO of Dick's, Ed Stack, took the decision not to sell the guns but to destroy them instead.

An hour after the NRA clicked send on its Tweet the response was hundreds of people announcing their intention to go and buy from the retailer and highly critical of the NRAs continuing failure to take any action regarding gun reform.

Dick's was praised for taking an adult approach to the problem of civilian deaths from military grade weaponry. The NRA has consistently blocked attempts to reform US gun legislation.

There has been a growing impetus in the US to look at the rights accorded to citizens under the Second Amendment, with Antonin Scalia, Justice of the Supreme Court, postulating that the Amendment does not mean people can own any type of gun they wish for whatever reason.

Americans Vote With Their Money

Twitter users added their own praise and thanks to the Sporting company’s Twitter feed and stated their intention to support the company by spending with them over the weekend.


The main feeling was that Dick's had done the right thing by removing the weapons from the market and preventing them reaching the streets.

Speaking in an interview with CBS the CEO of Dick's expressed his wish to keep the streets free of assault weapons, adding that he could not understand why anyone could argue that there was no need for background checks when buying these weapons.

The NRA remains defiant in its opposition of gun reform. Last week it refused to comply with a subpoena served by New York’s Attorney General to their advertising firm and said it will not disclose documents that are said to contain evidence of interference and obstruction in the legal process of reform. 

The subpoena is part of a larger investigation in the NRAs tax-exempt status. 

ADVERTISEMENT